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Portada del sitio > Prensa > AUMENTAN LOS TUMORES CEREBRALES, ESPECIALMENTE EN JÓVENES Y NIñOS EN EL (...)

AUMENTAN LOS TUMORES CEREBRALES, ESPECIALMENTE EN JÓVENES Y NIñOS EN EL REINO UNIDO

Jueves 30 de abril de 2009 · 1784 lecturas

STARS BACK CANCER RALLY

Seve Ballesteros
Tuesday April 28,2009
By Paul Jeeves Have your say(2)
A CELEBRITY-led campaign for more Government funding on vital brain tumour research is being launched today.

Stars, who include tumour survivors pop star and actor Martin Kemp and opera singer Russell Watson, are backing a protest rally by 14 charities at the Houses of Parliament.

Brain tumours are the leading cancer killer among the under-40s and disturbing statistics out today show that the illness is on the rise.

A third more children died in 2007 than in 2001, while 65 per cent more women die from it than from cervical cancer.

Actress Sheila Hancock said: “More funding is long overdue.”

Golfers Nick Faldo, Tony Jacklin and John O’Leary also back the cause in sympathy for Seve Ballesteros, a brain tumour sufferer.

Kemp said: “The diagnosis is devastating. But if found in time and you get the right treatment, you can survive and live life to the full. It can’t be left to luck or chance.”

More details: www.brain tumourresearch.org

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Child cancer deaths led by brain tumoursDigg it Caroline Davies
The Observer, Sunday 26 April 2009
Article history
Brain tumours are the leading cause of childhood cancer deaths in Britain, with half as many more children dying from the illness as from leukaemia. Figures from the Office of National Statistics show that in 2007 there were 47% more deaths from brain tumours among under-15s than from leukaemia. Yet that is not reflected in the money spent on research, say campaigners.

This week sees the launch of Brain Tumour Research, a national coalition of 14 charities, which believe that research is "woefully underfunded". It is backed by celebrities including the actress Sheila Hancock, whose grandson survived a tumour, and actor Martin Kemp and opera singer Russell Watson, who were both treated successfully.

Hancock, 76, the widow of actor John Thaw, saw her grandson Jack diagnosed with a rare tumour aged four. "It is terrible to watch a grandchild go through the diagnosis and treatment of a brain tumour. You feel so helpless." Jack was successfully operated on.

Kevin O’Neill, a consultant neurosurgeon at Imperial College London, said: "Brain tumours are on the increase, reportedly in the region of 2% per year. But in my unit we have seen the number of cases nearly double in the last year."

braintumourresearch.org

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